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 Downtown Rock Springs 

  

 Broadway Theater 

 Downtown Rock Springs 

 Red Canyon Overlook 

 Flaming Gorge National Recreation Area. 

 Sweetwater County Fair 

 "Wyoming's Big Show" 

 Fly Fishing 

 On The Green River 

Bridger Coal Company

  • Mining
932 9 mile road
Point of Rocks, WY 82942
(307) 922-7601
(307) 362-5330 (fax)

About Us

Jim Bridger Plant is named for the renowned explorer and mountain man, John Jim Bridger.
His pioneering spirit is alive today in the way this power facility has responded to its role as a low-cost read more
  • About

    Jim Bridger Plant is named for the renowned explorer and mountain man, John Jim Bridger.
    His pioneering spirit is alive today in the way this power facility has responded to its role as a low-cost energy producer, resource manager
    and environmental steward. Energy, a natural resource. A massive amount of energy is held by nature beneath the rugged, beautiful face
    of Wyoming: oil, gas, uranium, coal.
    That geologic legacy is the foundation of what today is one
    of the largest electric generating complexes in the Rocky
    Mountain area: the coal-fueled Jim Bridger steam-electric plant.
    Sub-bituminous coal stretches out for miles just beneath
    the surface of southwestern Wyoming; the product of
    forests and swamps changed by time into vast coal seams.
    It is the energy locked in that coal that enables this facility
    to produce up to 2,119,000 kilowatts of electricity per hour
    from four generating units. That electricity serves people
    throughout the West. To get the job done requires the talents
    of nearly 350 skilled and dedicated Wyoming residents.
    People, power and production
    Converting coal into electric energy available at the flip
    of a switch can be described in just a few words: coal is
    burned to produce high-pressure steam that spins large
    turbine-generators, which produce electricity. In practice,
    this process requires a complex blending of systems.
    Four operating units, each with a 2,800-degree furnace,
    produce 1,000-degree steam, which turn turbines.

  • Media

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